Iraqi Dinar Value Is Still Determined by Political Stability and Expanding Oil Output

Iraqi Dinar Value Is Still Determined by Political Stability and Expanding Oil Output

The Iraqi dinar is the licensed currency of Iraq. The country stays largely isolated from international financial markets. The country does not have any true sovereign credit; there is very little demand for its money which remains thinly traded.

All Iraqi assets, including its money, are seen as currently being a high financial risk. The Iraqi dinar value, or the Iraqi dinar exchange rate, is successfully determined by the central bank through it is US currency sales.

Iraqi Dinar Value Is Still Determined by Political Stability and Expanding Oil Output

image source: google

The Iraq currency started circulation once Iraq gained its independence in 1932 after being dominated by the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire and then Britain.

Before the dinar, the Iraqi money was the Indian rupee, introduced small creativity by the British shortly after they defeated Turkey in WWI and took over the direction of Iraq.

Initially, when it was first put into circulation, the Iraqi currency was reprinted towards the British pound. By 1959 Iraqi national wealth had proven to be increasingly combined with oil. Oil was priced and traded worldwide concerning the US money.

With the introduction of fiscal sanctions following the first US Gulf War, financial situation deteriorated dramatically in Iraq. Inflation spiraled into an annual rate of over 1000 percent by early 1993, unemployment expanded to over 50% and the worthiness of the Iraq money fell considerably.

During 1994, the dinar was valued at roughly 2,500 per 1 US currency. In a bid to assist the new currency, a range of actions was established including a new law in 1996 allowing taxpayers to use bank accounts in a foreign currency.  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *